Why don’t bugs die when they hit the ground once they’ve fallen from a high distance? 

(An explanation of terminal velocity)

Say an ant has crawled out of its nest which is located 60 feet (20 m) above the jungle floor. Then suppose a gust of wind tips the ant over off the tree and she starts her descent towards the jungle floor. As she falls, her natural instinct is to spread her legs like a parachute to try and slow her descent towards the ground. As she falls towards the jungle floor, she starts to pick up speed and then reaches her terminal velocity of about 4 mph (6.4 km/hour), then falls to the ground unharmed or dead. 

The main thing that helped our ant survive the fall, was the fact that ants, and any other small creatures, have little mass relative to their air resistance, meaning that they fall slowly and, therefore, have little energy to dissipate when they hit the ground. We must remember that it is not the fall that kills a creature, yet it is the sudden stop at the ground which will kill a creature. 

Her decision to spread her legs out like a parachute also aided in her safe descent to the ground. This is because the retarding force known as air resistance. Air resistance exists because air molecules collide into a falling body creating an upward force opposite gravity. This upward force will eventually balance the falling body’s weight. It will continue to fall at constant velocity known as the terminal velocity, which will stay the same until she reaches the ground (Because she has less terminal velocity, because of her small body, she hits the ground unharmed).    

Ants, like all objects falling through the atmosphere, have a terminal velocity that depends on their shape, size, and mass. An ant picks up speed as she falls through the air. The air, in turn, resists her movement with a force proportional to the square of her speed. Eventually she reaches a speed at which the upward drag forces exactly balance her downward weight and she stops accelerating. That speed is her terminal velocity.

The terminal velocity of a small to medium ant is about 4 mph (6.4 km/hour), according to the physics department of the University of Illinois. An ant would fall faster, given a ball-like shape, but the ant’s no dummy. She thrusts her legs out, presenting more surface to the air, to fall slower, like a flat sheet of paper instead of a balled-up sheet. Indeed, a man has a terminal velocity of about 125 mph (200 km/hour) with arms and legs fully extended to catch the wind like a parachute and about 200 mph (320 km/hour) when curled into a ball. 

So, depending on an objects mass and terminal velocity, determines whether or not they survive a fall. As you can see, small creatures such as ants, spiders, frogs, etc have less momentum when falling from great distances and reach their terminal velocity quicker than a much larger object. This means that a small creature has less energy to dissipate when they hit the ground, oppose to a larger object having more energy to dissipate when they hit the ground.

Why don’t bugs die when they hit the ground once they’ve fallen from a high distance?

(An explanation of terminal velocity)

Say an ant has crawled out of its nest which is located 60 feet (20 m) above the jungle floor. Then suppose a gust of wind tips the ant over off the tree and she starts her descent towards the jungle floor. As she falls, her natural instinct is to spread her legs like a parachute to try and slow her descent towards the ground. As she falls towards the jungle floor, she starts to pick up speed and then reaches her terminal velocity of about 4 mph (6.4 km/hour), then falls to the ground unharmed or dead.

The main thing that helped our ant survive the fall, was the fact that ants, and any other small creatures, have little mass relative to their air resistance, meaning that they fall slowly and, therefore, have little energy to dissipate when they hit the ground. We must remember that it is not the fall that kills a creature, yet it is the sudden stop at the ground which will kill a creature.

Her decision to spread her legs out like a parachute also aided in her safe descent to the ground. This is because the retarding force known as air resistance. Air resistance exists because air molecules collide into a falling body creating an upward force opposite gravity. This upward force will eventually balance the falling body’s weight. It will continue to fall at constant velocity known as the terminal velocity, which will stay the same until she reaches the ground (Because she has less terminal velocity, because of her small body, she hits the ground unharmed).

Ants, like all objects falling through the atmosphere, have a terminal velocity that depends on their shape, size, and mass. An ant picks up speed as she falls through the air. The air, in turn, resists her movement with a force proportional to the square of her speed. Eventually she reaches a speed at which the upward drag forces exactly balance her downward weight and she stops accelerating. That speed is her terminal velocity.

The terminal velocity of a small to medium ant is about 4 mph (6.4 km/hour), according to the physics department of the University of Illinois. An ant would fall faster, given a ball-like shape, but the ant’s no dummy. She thrusts her legs out, presenting more surface to the air, to fall slower, like a flat sheet of paper instead of a balled-up sheet. Indeed, a man has a terminal velocity of about 125 mph (200 km/hour) with arms and legs fully extended to catch the wind like a parachute and about 200 mph (320 km/hour) when curled into a ball.

So, depending on an objects mass and terminal velocity, determines whether or not they survive a fall. As you can see, small creatures such as ants, spiders, frogs, etc have less momentum when falling from great distances and reach their terminal velocity quicker than a much larger object. This means that a small creature has less energy to dissipate when they hit the ground, oppose to a larger object having more energy to dissipate when they hit the ground.

Found this on the net. I don’t know how real or fake it is, but you guys can be the judge of that.  This “statue”of a supposedly Toltec or Mesoamerican face is lying in the sands of Mars, in the Martian Valley. The photo was taken on January 30th, 2014, by the Mars rover curiosity. It is supposedly a Toltec or Mesoamerican face. To me personally, it’s a bit iffy, but still looks kinda cool. Is this just another case of pareidolia, or is there really something there? You be the judge.  Watch the videos below:https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ZcS0VWSnVJMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xH5nprNjfFY

Found this on the net. I don’t know how real or fake it is, but you guys can be the judge of that.

This “statue”of a supposedly Toltec or Mesoamerican face is lying in the sands of Mars, in the Martian Valley. The photo was taken on January 30th, 2014, by the Mars rover curiosity. It is supposedly a Toltec or Mesoamerican face. To me personally, it’s a bit iffy, but still looks kinda cool. Is this just another case of pareidolia, or is there really something there? You be the judge.

Watch the videos below:

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ZcS0VWSnVJM

https://www.youtube.com/
watch?feature=player_embedded&v=xH5nprNjfFY

The Candelabra of the Andes, Peru.

The Paracas Candelabra, also known as The Candelabra of the Andes, is located on the northern face of the Paracas Peninsula at Pisco Bay in Peru. 

Artifacts and pottery found in the area have been radio carbon dated to around 200 BCE, meaning the site is usually tied to the Paracas culture. Local Natives hold the traditions that this structure represents the lightning rod or staff of the god Viracocha.There are other legends that it is a masonic sign or a symbol that would be seen from sea by sailors trying to find a place to land. It has even been suggested that the Candelabra was built as a sign to sailors, or even as a symbolic representation of a hallucinogenic plant called Jimson weed (Datura stramonium).

Besides modern archeologists dating this site to about 200 BCE and tying it to the Paracas culture, the exact date and peoples who made this symbol are still unknown.

The Candelabra of the Andes, Peru.

The Paracas Candelabra, also known as The Candelabra of the Andes, is located on the northern face of the Paracas Peninsula at Pisco Bay in Peru.

Artifacts and pottery found in the area have been radio carbon dated to around 200 BCE, meaning the site is usually tied to the Paracas culture. Local Natives hold the traditions that this structure represents the lightning rod or staff of the god Viracocha.There are other legends that it is a masonic sign or a symbol that would be seen from sea by sailors trying to find a place to land. It has even been suggested that the Candelabra was built as a sign to sailors, or even as a symbolic representation of a hallucinogenic plant called Jimson weed (Datura stramonium).

Besides modern archeologists dating this site to about 200 BCE and tying it to the Paracas culture, the exact date and peoples who made this symbol are still unknown.

"Constantly regard the universe as one living being, having one substance and one soul; and observe how all things have reference to one perception, the perception of this one living being; and how all things act with one movement; and how all things are the cooperating causes of all things which exist; observe too the continuous spinning of the thread and the contexture of the web." - Marcus Aurelius, Book IV, 40.

"Constantly regard the universe as one living being, having one substance and one soul; and observe how all things have reference to one perception, the perception of this one living being; and how all things act with one movement; and how all things are the cooperating causes of all things which exist; observe too the continuous spinning of the thread and the contexture of the web." - Marcus Aurelius, Book IV, 40.